But it did change our attitude to gun ownership

From Andrew Bolt, Of all the absurd analogies offered by the wilfully blind:

George Megalogenis, who has written a book and produced a documentary linking Australia’s economic success to its immigration program, said … the recent spate of terrorism-related arrests should not affect Australia’s attitudes to Muslim migration any more than the Martin Bryant massacre should affect mainland attitudes towards Tasmania.

It truly is an absurd analogy. Rightly or wrongly, we completely changed our gun ownership laws because of this one unique instance. Whether it did or did not make us safer, that was the premise of these changes. Our immigration program ought to at least not make us less safe on our streets, or when we go off to an ANZAC Day parade.

And for what it’s worth, the article Andrew was referencing was titled, Five million visas into Australia this year likely to set new records. Immigration is a good thing, generally agreed upon by all, if the numbers are increasing at a moderate rate so that migrants can be assimilated into our way of life. These are the necessary characteristics of migrants that we can agree on:

“If a nation’s immigration programme is well crafted and targeted, and migrants enjoy high levels of economic participation, as distinct from high levels of social exclusion and welfare-dependency, immigration has beneficial impacts in terms of growth in the demand for goods and services; increases in national income, and living standards; improved labour participation; expansion of the economy’s productive capacity; and growth in household consumption and public revenues.”

Every migrant comes at a substantial cost to the economy which is only repaid slowly over time and will only do so if they are productively employed. The kinds of migrants we should do everything we can to keep out are precisely those with “high levels of social exclusion and welfare-dependency”.