Who knows? Maybe the worms really are turning

NeverTrumpers: What if Trump really is making America great again?

They are afflicted with a nagging suspicion. Trump might, how shall they whisper it, Make America Great Again.

The tax bill has given the economy a bit of a tailwind, most Americans have more money in their pockets, and corporations have greater incentives to step up spending and to bring some funds home. The NAFTA trade agreement with Mexico and Canada likely will be revised to America’s advantage. The president’s decision to punish Assad for crossing the red line that Obama refused to enforce is popular and his decision to defer to his military advisers and keep the response targeted so as not to induce a response from Russia has met with broad approval. His threats against North Korea—my nukes are bigger than your nukes—appalled the fastidious members of the establishment diplomatic community, but have Kim Jong-un claiming to be willing to negotiate a peace treaty with South Korea and détente with the United States.

Then there is China. Trump has done what previous administrations failed to do: forced China to make some concessions, opening at least a crack in the wall it has erected against imports. Majority-owned American financial firms will gain entry into several sectors, and tariffs on made-in-America automobiles will come down, while the United States tightens restrictions on intellectual property theft by the Chinese regime, in part by limiting China’s ability to buy tech-heavy U.S. firms. Even dyed-in-the-cotton-apparel free-traders are now conceding that the president’s negotiating tactic—threaten to bring down the international system, unless it gets fixed—is working. And should have been tried administrations ago. . . .

So here is BT and AT:

Before Trump, Assad could use chemical weapons with impunity; after Trump, he pays a steep price. BT, China could plunder American intellectual property and disregard the rules of the trading system that it has manipulated in its rise to power; AT, it fears Trump’s tariffs sufficiently to begin modifying its unfair trading practices. BT, Russia could wage cyberwar on the U.S. electoral system without fear of response from America; AT, Putin and his oligarch cronies find themselves being cut off from access to the world financial system. BT, the economy was mired in sub-trend growth; AT and his tax cut, growth is up. BT, in the post-war years most presidents projected a dignity of sorts; AT, presidential dignity is not even considered a virtue.

The above is via Instapundit. The one below is from The Guardian! The ‘deep state’ is real. But are its leaks against Trump justified? where the answer is no. This is the subhead:

Even the most severe critics of the US president should worry about this subtle form of anti-democratic abuse

And worry you should. These are the concluding paras:

The whole intelligence collection system – which has an importance that far transcends its undoubtedly large importance in this discrete context – is vulnerable here for the simple reason that the intermixture of politics with intelligence collection is the intelligence system’s Achilles’ heel.

If surveillance comes to be seen through a domestic political lens, with domestic political winners and losers, the intelligence community will have a very hard time acting with needed public credibility. And that in turn means it will have a harder time doing what it needs to do to keep us safe.

Maybe, but only just maybe, there might be a bit of realism finding its way through. There are plenty of problems to be dealt with, and for a change there is a president who not only wishes to fix things, but has actually shown that he might just be able to. Would be nice if others began to see an advantage working with him on things they can agree on, and not just opposing what he is doing just because of who these things are being done by.

AND THERE’S MORE: This is via John Hinderaker at Powerline: CANDACE OWENS’ MOMENT: I’M NOT FAR RIGHT, I’M FREE

Which also includes this:

Yesterday morning, Kanye West tweeted his approval of Candace:

KANYE WEST

@kanyewest

I love the way Candace Owens thinks

And if you go to the link there’s much more as well.

Madness is the new normal

Does seem to show how relatively incompetent all of Trump’s recent predecessors were. But there is still all of this.

China military islands now control South China Sea…
Beijing final touches on battle plan to take back Taiwan?
Xi says internet control key to stability…

Not to mention this.

Moscow sends warship through English Channel…
ISIS Threatens CNN, Universal Studios…
LONDONISTAN: Leading Surgeon Predicts Summer of Carnage…
Al-Qaeda Using GOOGLE Maps to Plan Attacks…
Iran vows ‘expected and unexpected’ moves if U.S. exits nuclear deal

Yet what are the dominant issues for the loyal opposition and the media?

Problem solving as an aim now seems to be addressed towards solving the psychological problems of around half the population and not dealing with political issues. As found here, for example:

TO ALL HER OTHER CHARMS, SHE ADDS PARANOIA:  ‘They Were Never Going to Let Me Be President,’ Said the Woman Who Thought It Was Her Due.

 

What does one need to know to be an expert in human rights?

What expertise does someone appointed to the Human Rights Commission need to have? What is an expert in “human rights” and what do such people know that the rest of us might not? They pay these people a third of a million dollars a year, but what are they other than friends of those who make the appointments? Do they know the difference between good and evil? Can they even explain the difference between right and wrong? What exactly are we allowed to do and not allowed to do? Is the law merely made up of their own personal judgement? Are they given the right to plague other people because of their own personal opinions? Who are they and what do they know about anything?

Let us start with this story from Janet Albrechtsen:

Consider the poor barber at the Hunters Hill Barber Shop. Late last year Sam Rahim turned away a woman who wanted him to cut her daughter’s hair. Sam the barber told her he was qualified only to cut boys’ hair, politely directing her to a salon up the road. She took to social media and ran to the Australian Human Rights Commission claiming he breached anti-discrimination laws. He offered an apology. And now he has been served with court papers for a claim that he breached the Sex Discrimination Act.

Sam and his wife, Ronda, have set up a GoFundMe page because, as he told the media, “The legal costs are more than we have ever anticipated.”

Seriously, in what possible way is this a human rights issue? Do these people even have the foggiest idea what human rights are? Because of their oceanic ignorance, they are in the process of discrediting one of the most important concepts at the heart of Western civilisation.

Let me continue with Tim Blair in a post he titles, Finest intro ever written:

Daily Telegraph colleague Miranda Devine makes several strong points in her latest terrific column. Let’s take a detailed look, starting from the top:

Race Discrimination Commissioner Tim Soutphommasane’s term expires in August …

Actually, although there are no doubt many strong points, I wasn’t able to read anything beyond that opening line due to tequila shots.

So following from Tim and Miranda, let me take you to Frank Chung: For $340,000 a year, we deserve better than Race Discrimination Commissioner Tim Soutphommasane which has as its subhead:

AUSTRALIA’S race discrimination commissioner has lamented the “dismal” fact that there are too many white people in top positions.

These are Frank’s last two paras:

There may be many reasons for the lack of one-to-one population representation at the very highest levels of business and politics — but for the Race Discrimination Commissioner, when you’re a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

For someone who is paid $340,000 a year to come up with this dross, it’s not surprising the concept of meritocracy is a foreign one. Or is that being racist?

Forget about good and evil or right and wrong, of which these people appear to have no clear idea at all. How about just something as simple as profit and loss, something else they have no clear idea about at all. If they really think it is a human rights issue for a men’s barber not to cut women’s hair, they need to be sent to a re-education camp as soon as possible and for as long as it takes. And just in case they don’t get it, which is likely, this is just meant as a joke.

It’s much worse than you might ever have thought

DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT HISTORY: Holocaust Museum tour by lawmaker who said Jews control the weather does not go well.

The photo, taken in 1935, depicts a woman in a dark dress shuffling down a street in Norden, Germany. A large sign hangs from her neck: “I am a German girl and allowed myself to be defiled by a Jew.” She is surrounded by Nazi stormtroopers.

D.C. Council member Trayon White Sr. (D-Ward 8) studied the image. “Are they protecting her?”

Lynn Williams, an expert on educational programs at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and White’s tour guide for the day, stared at the photo.

“No,” she said. “They’re marching her through.”

“Marching through is protecting,” White said.

“I think they’re humiliating her,” Williams replied.

* * * * * * *

The tour, scheduled to last 90 minutes, was halfway done. Seven of White’s staff members stayed with the guide, who soon was showing them an exhibit on the Warsaw Ghetto. As she explained the walling in of Polish Jews, one aide asked whether it was similar to “a gated community.”

Glazer spoke up.

“Yeah, I wouldn’t call it a gated community,” she said. “More like a prison.”

Via Instapundit

I can see there’s a consensus building for the next departure from the HRC

Let us begin with Tim Blair in a post he titles, Finest intro ever written:

Daily Telegraph colleague Miranda Devine makes several strong points in her latest terrific column. Let’s take a detailed look, starting from the top:

Race Discrimination Commissioner Tim Soutphommasane’s term expires in August …

Actually, although there are no doubt many strong points, I wasn’t able to read anything beyond that opening line due to tequila shots.

So following from Tim and Miranda, let me take you to Frank Chung: For $340,000 a year, we deserve better than Race Discrimination Commissioner Tim Soutphommasane which has as its subhead:

AUSTRALIA’S race discrimination commissioner has lamented the “dismal” fact that there are too many white people in top positions.

I will leave you with Frank’s last two paras:

There may be many reasons for the lack of one-to-one population representation at the very highest levels of business and politics — but for the Race Discrimination Commissioner, when you’re a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

For someone who is paid $340,000 a year to come up with this dross, it’s not surprising the concept of meritocracy is a foreign one. Or is that being racist?

 

“The perpetrator is considered to be as much of a victim as the victim”

This is so spot on it’s amazing no one has said it before. He is talking about the stabbings in London:

“All of the attacks are non-white, and so they cannot be truthfully addressed by the British government or the Met Police or the BBC because of political correctness.

“What this means is that the perpetrator is considered to be as much of a victim as the actual victim.”

Soon they will have to start arresting the people who are stabbed for incitement to violence.

If this is true, why aren’t they in jail?

Via Instapundit:

MICHAEL MUKASEY: Trump, Cohen, and Attorney-Client Privilege: The protection has limits, but is it worth testing them over a possible campaign-finance offense?

After anthrax spores killed five people, infected 17 others, and showed up in envelopes mailed to U.S. senators and media organizations in 2001, the current special counsel, then director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, spent years chasing and destroying the reputation of a microbiologist named Steven Hatfill, zealous in the belief that Mr. Hatfill was the guilty party. Another zealot, James Comey, then deputy attorney general, said he was “absolutely certain” no mistake had been made.

After Mr. Hatfill was exonerated—he received more than $5.5 million in damages from the government—Mr. Mueller then decided that another microbiologist, Bruce Ivins, was the culprit. When Ivins committed suicide, Mr. Mueller pronounced the case closed. A subsequent investigation by the National Academy of Sciences suggests Ivins too was innocent.

Mr. Mueller is not a bad man, nor is Mr. Comey. It’s just that both show particular confidence when making mistakes, which makes one grateful for safeguards like the attorney-client privilege.

Well, I wouldn’t say that Mueller and Comey are good men. And neither has faced any significant accountability for his mistakes and misbehavior.

Not bad men! They are evil beyond belief.

“Without me, they wouldn’t be discussing anything”

Stormy Daniels is still news, but this barely raises a ripple: US and North Korea holding ‘extremely high level’ talks ahead of Trump’s meeting with Kim Jong-un.

“We have had direct talks at very high levels – extremely high levels – with North Korea,” Trump said.

“We’ll either have a very good meeting or we won’t have a good meeting,” he added. “And maybe we won’t even have a meeting at all, depending on what’s going in. But I think that there’s a great chance to solve a world problem.” The president did not answer shouted questions about whether he has spoken with Kim.

Kim’s offer for a summit was initially conveyed to Trump by South Korea last month, and the president shocked many when it was announced that he had accepted. US officials have indicated over the past two weeks that North Korea’s government has communicated directly with Washington that it is ready to discuss its nuclear weapons program.

Abe, who has voiced fears that short- and medium-range missiles that pose a threat to Japan might not be part of the US negotiations, praised Trump on Tuesday for his bravery in agreeing to meet with the North Korean dictator.

“I’d like to commend Donald’s courage in his decision to have the upcoming summit meeting with the North Korean leader,” Abe said.

Trump took credit for the inter-Korean talks, saying, “Without us and without me, in particular, I guess you would have to say, they wouldn’t be discussing anything.”

Time Magazine does, however, find the right sort of nincompoop analysis: Will Trump Make a Bad Deal With North Korea?

You never know, but he’ll likely make a better deal than anyone else has since 1950. But it is a funny thing that I share one worry with the media and the left: whether Trump will make it for another seven years. The difference is they worry that he will and I worry that he won’t.

Line and staff

Slightly adapted from this article where the reference is to health care:

Let us for a moment consider the land of the sane. In the land of the sane, education is a business, and a business generally has two categories of workers: line and staff. Line workers generate revenue by directly participating in the company’s line of business. Staff workers consume revenue in their roles supporting the line positions. A smart business seeks to balance the two kinds, maximizing the number of line positions while minimizing the number of staff positions.

Where revenue is driven by governments cost control all but disappears.