Financial analysts of the world unite

I know that some of you cannot go to the link which is behind the paywall, but in this case you might think about ways to read the whole article. Head off to some coffee shop or the local library. Perhaps even shell out the $3.00. But this is what you should read, which comes with a title that provides you with little sense of what comes next: Piano’s not the key to wealth. I might also mention that the article might also depress you unless you are in on the scam scheme yourself.

The best pianists, for all their thousands of hours of practice and performances, will earn crumbs compared to even second-tier fund managers. The salaries of the best doctors and barristers’ incomes are dwarfed those of money managers.

That’s because they are labourers, and labour is relatively cheap. Siphoning off a portion of capital income is real money.

And in no country is this truer than Australia, where regulation ensures $30bn flows into superannuation accounts every three months. Indeed, whoever wins the federal election will supercharge that flow as the compulsory rate of saving cranks up to 12 per cent by the mid-2020s. Labor, in one of the greatest transfers of wealth ever, wants a 15 per cent rate.

All this and more are from Adam Creighton’s visit to Omaha to listen to Warren Buffett and discuss money management with a number of the 18,000 who showed up to listen to what he had to say. There is then also this:

In advice to budding financiers, Buffett revealed the second and main swing favour of asset management: don’t become a good analyst, be a salesman. At 1.5 per cent a year, you’ll quickly be rich. The wonders of pay based on percentages can’t be oversold, especially in a world where financial assets are swelling faster than inflation and the population together. Managing $1bn entails no more labour than $10m but, for a fee of 1 per cent a year, the pay differs.

The best pianists, for all their thousands of hours of practice and performances, will earn crumbs compared to even second-tier fund managers. The salaries of the best doctors and barristers’ incomes are dwarfed those of money managers.

That’s because they are labourers, and labour is relatively cheap. Siphoning off a portion of capital income is real money.

And in no country is this truer than Australia, where regulation ensures $30bn flows into superannuation accounts every three months. Indeed, whoever wins the federal election will supercharge that flow as the compulsory rate of saving cranks up to 12 per cent by the mid-2020s. Labor, in one of the greatest transfers of wealth ever, wants a 15 per cent rate.

As wages stagnate and asset prices soar, the division of jobs between those who rely on wages and those whose “wages” entail a hefty chunk of capital income raises questions about the fairness of the tax system.

I’m as against Labor’s proposed interference in childcare wages as the next furious pundit. It is already a bottomless pit of public spending and any extra will be hoovered up by childcare centres. The proposal does nothing to unbutton the straitjacket on workers’ productivity imposed by Labor’s “quality framework”, which mandated maximum child-to-carer ratios among other feel-good imposts that abolished affordable childcare.

The last paras:

Regulation tends to benefit the better off, as it did in Omaha, where low-income Uber and Lyft drivers did a roaring trade. But too bad for them a federal rule in response to Nebraska floods outlawed “gouging” of consumers in emergencies. Without surge pricing, Omaha’s rich visitors enjoyed cheap $US7 rides between high-end hotels and bars.

“Why are you poorer than Warren?” Munger [the $2 billion dollar man] was asked.

“Well, why was Albert Einstein so much poorer than me?” he mused, after a long pause. Becoming a scientist is also a bad idea.

You have now read around a third, so you can decide whether to spend the $3. Nevertheless, it might be the best career advice you ever get. Still, I would rather be Albert Einstein than Warren Buffett, but that’s just me.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.