The level of employment is unrelated to the level of aggregate demand

Mill’s Fourth Proposition on Capital is the element of classical economic theory most foreign to the modern mind. In seven words, Mill stated a truth that has stood the test of time and has never been refuted by any event in history.

Demand for commodities is not demand for labour.

Or in modern words, the level of employment is unrelated to the level of aggregate demand. It is refuted every time public spending is raised to lower unemployment, which has never succeeded on even a single occasion. It was refuted when Peter Costello cut public spending in 1996 and 1997 eventually eliminating not just the deficit but the actual existence of public debt while unemployment disappeared and personal incomes grew at record rates.

And now here from John Hinderaker at Powerline is another instance showing the validity of classical theory over modern macroeconomic junk science: AMAZINGLY, ECONOMY DIDN’T CARE ABOUT “SHUTDOWN”.

I never did notice the extremely-partial government “shutdown,” but some people thought it was a big deal. Not private employers, apparently:

Private payrolls grew in January at a much faster pace than expected as the labor market shrugged off the longest U.S. government shutdown in history, according to data released Wednesday by ADP and Moody’s Analytics.

“Shrugged off”? I don’t know, maybe they welcomed it.

Companies added 213,000 jobs this month, the data show. Economists polled by Refinitiv expected payrolls to grow by 178,000.

The strong jobs growth comes even as the U.S. government was shut down for 35 days in a standoff between President Donald Trump and congressional Democrats over his demand for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

“Even as.”

“The job market weathered the government shutdown well. Despite the severe disruptions, businesses continued to add aggressively to their payrolls,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics.

“Weathered.” “Despite the severe disruptions.” Really? What disruptions were those? Did they consider that a brief respite from a small portion of government heavy-handedness may have been irrelevant to job growth, or even a positive factor? Evidently not.

There is more good sense in Mill’s 1848 Principles of Political Economy than in any Keynesian text written since 1936. The evidence is overwhelming, but when has evidence ever counted for anything when ideology said something else?

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